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Description
  
  
652.1
Improve your business writing skills with the Writing with Power (652.1) online course. Learn new techniques to take your writing to the next level, while receiving personal feedback and direction.
Yes
  
914.1
Is feedback necessary? Studies show that giving and receiving feedback is a requirement of any functional relationship. Yet, many lack the confidence and skill to both deliver and receive it successfully. Electric co-op boards must give feedback to the CEO if the relationship with its only employee is to be effective and productive. Directors giving and receiving feedback from one another in boardroom discussions is a critical element for effective boardroom dialog. This course will provide valuable skills and instructor-guided practice opportunities to sharpen the skills needed to successfully give and receive both types of feedback.
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977.1
This class has the board member consider common board room decisions and how these decisions impact the cooperative’s financial strength. In one day, you will cover a year’s worth of key financial decisions and how they affect the cooperative’s equity position. Concepts will be reinforced through practical and strategic exercises designed to give attendees a theoretical understanding that he/she can apply to situations back at their own co-op.
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975.1

Adopting and implementing a capital credits policy are key responsibilities of a co-op’s board of directors and management. In this era of increased scrutiny of capital credits by members and legislators, directors must understand the co-op’s capital credits policy; be able to explain it to the membership; and ensure that management design and implement a communications plan for the co-op’s capital credits philosophy.

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974.1

The jointly developed (NRECA and CFC) publication titled, Retail Rate Guide (2017) is featured in this course. If you haven’t taken this course in over three years, it’s time to take it again. Directors discuss the complex issues that they must balance when they consider business plans, financial policies, alternative rate philosophies and strategies. This course discusses how current rates methodologies affect rising power costs and the current focus on energy efficiency and conservation. Attendees use case studies and problems to analyze and discuss issues such as equity goals, long-range revenue requirements, achieving fairness for multiple rate classes, and dealing with proposed rate increases.

No
  
958.1

Board, CEO and staff succession planning are essential to ensuring tomorrow’s purpose-driven organization. Personnel change is inevitable in every organization. Often, such change can be challenging, especially when vacancies occur in leadership positions. This course focuses on the board’s responsibility and role in ensuring that the cooperative has a succession plan in place for the CEO and its overall leadership. Also discussed is the board’s role in ensuring that the CEO has a process in place to ensure ongoing development of the organization’s workforce potential and a plan to ensure leadership continuity and quality.

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957.1

All effective organizations, corporations and institutions have at least one thing in common: They implement a formal process to evaluate their performance to find areas where they can improve. Increasingly, corporate boards are following suit. The board of directors is the globally recognized system for directing the affairs of a company or corporation and for ensuring its long-term health. Designed for cooperatives and public power district boards, this course will show them how to evaluate their own processes, including how they communicate with and appraise the chief executive; how they educate new directors; how they conduct strategic planning; how they govern themselves through the policy making process; and how they ensure they meet the long-term needs of the membership.

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956.1

This highly interactive one-day course teaches electric cooperative directors skills for creating alignment and agreement in the boardroom by fostering open dialogue around high-stakes, emotional or risky topics—on the issues that face electric cooperatives today. Using real world co-op examples, directors will practice speaking for clarity and purpose; encourage others to do the same; and, analyze the best ideas to make the highest-quality decisions with the goal of acting on issues with unity and commitment.

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913.1
Understanding the unique aspects of the cooperative business model better prepares directors to lead organizations with purpose not profit at their core. This is especially important in this the International Year of Cooperatives. Course participants will explore the cooperative principles and define how they provide a competitive advantage for today's co-op organizations.
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912.05
For electric cooperatives to sustain their success, we need to rediscover our purpose. By learning about the cooperative principles, values and the economic impact of electric co-ops, attendees will deepen their understanding of the cooperative business model. This highly interactive course allows participants to see how electric co-ops are part of a national and international network that seeks to make the world a better place, one community at a time.
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2,640

This course is designed to help directors understand the role of the board in financial planning, including identifying the basic documents used in financial planning and reporting, assessing the issues that drive financial decisions, balancing competing goals, and taking responsibility to monitor and evaluate results.

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941.2
For three tumultuous days in 1863, Gettysburg was the backdrop for one of the Civil War's most dynamic encounters. Decisions made, opportunities missed, passions sparked and conversations avoided changed the course of our country. Today, this historically sacred setting is the site of a powerful, soles-on-the-ground program designed specifically for electric cooperative directors that looks to those leaders, lessons and legacy with a clear, contemporary purpose: to set the stage for you to prepare for your greatest challenges.
 
Designed for relevance and directed by seasoned guides and instructors, this program takes experiential learning to a higher level. This multiday course examines the leadership styles, decisions and principles displayed by military leaders before, during and after the battle. Through classroom discussion, video illustrations and visits to the Gettysburg battlefield, participants will learn how to apply these timeless leadership lessons to current organizational situations and challenges.
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929.1
Policies set the standard for board behavior. Attendees learn to view policies as proactive tools to establish a standard of board behavior required for governance in today's electric cooperative boardroom. This course revisits the fundamentals of governance and the roles policies play in contributing to effective governance.
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918.1
Effective political engagement at all levels of government requires significant planning and is vital to empowering member-owners to protect and advance the interests of their cooperative. The power of distribution cooperatives to influence policymakers is vital to their continued success. This cour se helps directors connect the dots between what they as individual directors can do on behalf of their cooperative while maximizing relationships with their statewide and with NRECA to make sure the co-op voice is heard on Capitol Hill and in the regulatory agencies.
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901.1
This course provides an overview of what directors need to know about parliamentary procedure to become more effective participants in board meetings. Participants will understand the purpose ad use of proper procedure in business meetings and become familiar with the basic structure and content of Robert's Rules of Order.
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2,630
Boards have ultimate responsibility for ensuring and evaluating the long-term health of the organization. They help fulfill this duty through strategic thinking, identifying goals through strategic planning and authorizing the appropriate allocation of resources through the adoption of financial po licies, budget review and approval and monitoring management's progress toward strategic goals. This course teaches directors how to participate effectively in strategic thinking and planning processes.
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2,620
The board of directors is responsible for managing the affairs of the corporation. In fulfilling its duties, the board typically can only take official action via majority vote in a duly convened meeting. This course focuses on the legal requirements for holding board meetings and also on the human factors and group processes that make such meetings productive and effective. 
No
  
903.1
The board chair has the responsibility for organizing the meeting, creating a productive atmosphere, allowing for the free exchange of opinion, presenting the issues to be resolved, bringing the decisions to resolution, and moving the cooperative forward. This course focuses on the skills necessary to run an effective meeting, with group activities to practice handling common presiding problems. The material is presented in a practical framework in compliance with Robert's Rules of Order.
No
  
955.1
Directors have official responsibilities but they also tend to conform to the unique culture of their boardroom. Some cultures can promote board effectiveness, but others lead to conflict, complacency or similar counterproductive behaviors. This course explains the concept of boardroom culture through an examination of real board case studies and discusses why directors should understand and monitor their own boardroom cultures.
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951.2
The primary purpose of a board of directors is to make decisions. In today's complex energy industry, effective boardroom decision making is a must. Directors need the tools to assess today's challenges and to determine the best choice for the long-term interests of the cooperative's membership. This course provides directors with the techniques and skills needed to listen, identify issues, engage in constructive discussions and resolve conflicts so that the board can reach satisfactory solutions.
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963.1
This course focuses on the importance of technology planning by examining today's emerging technologies using four questions: What will the technology do for the membership? What will it do for the business of the cooperative? Is it cost effective? How well will it integrate with existing systems? This course explores a wide variety of technologies; the role of management versus the board in technology planning and strategies to get the most out of technology investments.
No
  
964.1
The emergence of Distributed Energy Resources (DER) technologies is giving consumers more choices than ever before. Electric cooperatives are well positioned as consumer-owned organizations to be their member's "trusted partner" in navigating the opportunities, risks and benefits of solar and other emerging technologies. This course discusses the top DER technologies, policy issues and questions that co-ops must be prepared to discuss with their members.
No
  
961.1
Electric co-op boards face a rapidly evolving energy landscape where power supply decisions are more complex, involve greater risks and have greater cost consequences for members than ever before. The low price of natural gas, the combination of state renewable portfolio requirements, the falling prices of wind and solar and environmental regulations are leading a fundamental shift in the U.S. electricity generation portfolio. This shift has significant implications for electricity suppliers and for consumers. This course focuses on strategies boards can pursue in the face of this uncertainty including understanding what members want, working closely with power suppliers, communicating with members and being their trusted energy advisor.
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944.1

Is feedback necessary? Many people don't like to offer feedback in a professional setting and even fewer like to receive it. However, studies show that giving and receiving feedback is a requirement of any functional relationship. Electric co-op boards must give feedback to the CEO if the relationship with its only employee is to be effective and productive. Directors receiving feedback from members is the bedrock principle of co-op democracy and member engagement. This course will provide valuable skills and instructor-guided practice opportunities to sharpen the skills needed to successfully give and receive both types of feedback.

No
  
943.1
Many co-ops are getting member requests for information as the energy industry evolves toward a consumer-centric model. Co-ops are well positioned as their members' trusted energy advisor to provide education and information on the changing energy landscape. While directors are not the co-op's official spokespersons they are sometimes asked questions by members when they are out in the community. This course provides directors with skills and guidance on how to handle such situations by either responding or referring questions to their co-op's CEO or designated spokesperson. Participants will observe and practice how (or how not) to communicate their co-op's policies, plans, and positions on such timely matters as rates, distributed energy resources, or the benefits of belonging to a consumer-centric cooperative utility.
No
  
935.1
The board is responsible for appraising and compensating the chief executive officer. Appraisal is the process of using agreed-upon measures to evaluate the CEO's performance. Compensation is the process of developing a salary range and approving a salary based on the appraisal. This course focuses on helping directors to fulfill these responsibilities to ensure a sound board-CEO relationship.
No
  
930.1
In this era of corporate accountability, boards and management are expected—and in some cases required—to implement standards, programs, and procedures addressing such issues as ethical behavior, document retention, whistle-blower protection, fraud risk assessment, and financial transparency. This course explains the background of these issues and presents practical strategies to help electric cooperatives design and develop plans and programs that address new governance expectations.
No
  
925.1
The continuing evolution of the structure of the electric industry in the U.S. has brought about increased scrutiny by consumers and regulators. As a result, many electric cooperatives are being challenged to make sure their bylaws adequately address new situations including changing membership, "large load" exceptions to some state territorial laws, diversified services, distributed generation, and changes in some state or federal laws and regulations. This course will assist directors, CEOs, and agents of electric cooperatives in undertaking a comprehensive review of the co-op's bylaws and highlight the implications that these changes, issues, and challenges bring to bear in future bylaw revisions.
No
  
924.1
Cooperatives are subject to the ongoing challenges of providing continuous service to their membership in the face of natural and man-made disasters. Whether it's a hurricane, tornado, cyber-attack or employee sabotage, directors play an increasingly important role in monitoring the activities of management to ensure that physical and IT assets are secure and safe. This course focuses on the directors' role in disaster planning and recovery, showing how they can fulfill the responsibility they have to their members by ensuring the continuity of electrical and business operations.
No
  
921.1
Electric co-op boards are operating in what may be one of the most challenging business environments any generation of directors has ever known. The array of risks ranges from financial, regulatory, cyber and economic to technology and changing member demographics. This course is designed to provide directors with the principles and tools to improve their processes for overseeing the cooperative's risk management activities. Using co-op examples and real world case studies, this interactive course discusses the unique role of board and management to identify, manage and mitigate risk with processes that are appropriate to the characteristics of individual cooperatives.
No
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